This abstract is summarized by IPR based on the original journal article in SAGE Open

Mary Louisa Cappelli, Ph.D., analyzed how the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe and indigenous grassroots leaders deployed digital media platforms to mobilize individuals from diverse backgrounds to share their artistic expression and stand in solidarity with the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe.

A discourse analysis of political posters and performances was conducted to determine how the posters and performances mobilized people to stand in solidarity with the Standing Rock Sioux Nation.

Key findings include:

·      Protest leaders drew upon Native American “ethos,” cultural traditions, and folklore to successfully rally indigenous and non-indigenous people to promote a renegotiation of power.
·      The interpretation and reproduction of manufactured posters inspired a “congruent and complementary” array of parallel posters and a “democratization” of certain images and ideas.
·      Social media platforms allowed individuals of all ages, race, ethnicities, social classes, and backgrounds to “actively network,” “forge alliances,” and participate in the mobilization.

Read the full study to learn how the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe and indigenous grassroots leaders mobilized people from all different backgrounds to stand in solidarity with the Tribe.

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Heidy Modarelli handles Growth & Marketing for IPR. She has previously written for Entrepreneur, TechCrunch, The Next Web, and VentureBeat.
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