Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and National Public Radio (NPR) conducted a poll focused on personal experience with discrimination across over a dozen areas of daily life.

The organizations conducted 3,453 interviews of men and women, including African Americans, Latinos, Asian Americans, Native Americans, whites and LGBTQ adults.

Key findings include:

  • 45% of African Americans experienced racial discrimination when trying to rent an apartment or buy a home.
  • 18% of Asian Americans say they have experienced discrimination when interacting with police.
    • Indian-Americans are much more likely than Chinese-Americans to report unfair police stops or treatment.
  • 17% of Latinos have avoided medical care due to concern of being discriminated against or treated poorly.
  • 34% of LGBTQ Americans say that they or a friend have been verbally harassed while using the restroom.
  • 41% of women report being discriminated against in equal pay and promotion opportunities.

The results of the “Discrimination in America” survey demonstrated major variation in reports of personal experience with discrimination because of race, gender, or LGBTQ identity.

In summary, the reports indicate a complex experience of discrimination across different areas of life and different groups in America. The reports demonstrate that these experiences represent a larger, systemic pattern of discrimination in America that have significant implications for both the health of individuals and America.

Read the full study to learn more about the different areas of daily life that are impacted by discrimination.

This study is available online, for free, here.

Citation:

Discrimination in America: Experiences and Views. (2020, August 31). Retrieved September 15, 2020, from https://www.rwjf.org/en/library/research/2017/10/discrimination-in-america–experiences-and-views.html

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Heidy Modarelli handles Growth & Marketing for IPR. She has previously written for Entrepreneur, TechCrunch, The Next Web, and VentureBeat.
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